Source: Mexico News Daily

Outpatients will be given low to medium doses for a maximum of seven days.

The federal Health Ministry will use the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine to treat 20,000 Covid-19 outpatients.

The director of the National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition told the newspaper Milenio that the health regulatory agency Cofepris has authorized the administration of the drug to patients recovering from Covid-19 in their homes.

José Sifuentes acknowledged that clinical trials have shown that high doses of hydroxychloroquine for a prolonged period of time can cause a range of side effects in Covid-19 patients but emphasized that the drug has been shown to reduce generalized inflammation in people with the disease.

In that context, he stressed that outpatients will be given only low to medium doses for a maximum of seven days starting in the early phase of their illness.

Sifuentes said that all patients receiving treatment with the drug will be closely monitored, explaining that the “careful follow-up” will occur at people’s homes and via telephone and video calls.

He said that 130,000 doses of hydroxychloroquine donated by the Swiss healthcare company Novartis will be distributed to national health institutes, regional hospitals and specialty hospitals, among other facilities. The use of the drug among ambulatory Covid-19 patients will commence next week.

Read the original article here: https://mexiconewsdaily.com/news/coronavirus/mexico-to-administer-hydroxychloroquine-to-20000/

Related:

Uganda also records good results treating COVID with hydroxychloroquine, chloroquine

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